Tag Archive: Joe Crowley

Oct 08 2012

A Clue To County’s Endorsement For Beep?

Brooklyn has the cannoli man, Queens has the kingmaker.

Melinda Katz is holding a fundraiser at Portofino restaurant in Queens where a high ranking democratic official will make a special appearance.

With the 2013 City Council races already heating up, many are wondering who will get the coveted County Endorsement and it just so happens that none other than political boss Rep. Joe Crowley will be the surprise guest at the fundraiser.

Will Crowley make a surprise endorsement?

Katz, a lobbyist, will be locked in a tough battle for control of Borough Hall with heavyweight opponents including City Councilman Peter Vallone, widely considered the frontrunner, Councilman Leroy Comrie, and State Senator Jose Peralta. Both Peralta and Comrie have considerable ties to the party, so at this point the County endorsement is really a toss up.

Even though Crowley will be attending more fundraisers, as reported by Colin Cambell,  we will venture to guess the the real clue is which fundraiser he doesn’t  attend.

George Arzt, the top former campaign advisor for John Liu, has also confirmed attendance.

Below is the invitation in case you decide to go and if you do, please send us video or audio.

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Please join us as we kick off Melinda Katz’s campaign for Queens Borough President!

With Special Guest Congressman Joe Crowley

When: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 from 6PM to 7:30PM

Where: Portofino Ristorante, 109-32 Ascan Avenue
Forest Hills, NY 11375 

Contribution Levels: Chair: $2,500.00 * Host: $1,000.00 
Sponsor: $500.00 * Patron: $250.00 * Guest: $175.00

To RSVP & Purchase tickets please click here: https://services.myngp.com/ngponlineservices/Event.aspx?Y=FrZ0S4jyDpULauwQdqsVMKXrsKMJk0laBghz%2FcCik8SnrnTS%2FCUDVQ%3D%3D

For more information please contact Katie at (347) 494-0492 or send her an email at Katie@melindakatz.com.

Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2012/10/a-clue-to-countys-endorsement-for-queens-beep/

Feb 12 2012

Crowley The Cash Cow

http://fairimmigration.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/crowley.jpg

Don’t look at me. That’s how the system works.

Queens County Democratic Boss, Joe Crowley is a top earner in a private equities PAC.

From The PolitickerThe Private Equity & Growth Capital Council, which was formed in 2007 by several of the country’s largest private equity firms, quietly formed a political action committee last spring and began making campaign contributions this past summer. New York City Congressman Joe Crowley was one of the top Democratic beneficiaries of donations from the private equity PAC. 

PEGCC spokesman Ken Spain told Fortune’sDan Primack the purpose of the private equity PAC was to support candidates who “understand the important role that private equity plays in driving economic growth, strengthening businesses and providing financial security to millions of Americans by delivering superior returns to public and private pension funds.”

Last year, PEGCC’s PAC mostly gave money to Republicans. Campaign finance reports show it gave roughly two-thirds of the $98,000 it spent during the last year to GOP politicians. Republican Congressmen Orrin Hatch and Spencer Bachus got the most money from PEGCC with $10,000 apiece. The Democratic politicians who received the most money from the private equity PAC were South Dakota Congressman Tim Johnson and Mr. Crowley, who each received contributions of $5,000 from PEGCC.

…For full article: http://www.politicker.com/2012/02/06/private-equity-pac-showed-a-lot-of-love-to-congressman-joe-crowley/

Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2012/02/crowley-the-cash-cow/

Dec 14 2011

The Last Of The Clubhouse Bosses

Where have you gone Tony Seminerio? The NYC mayoral candidates turn their lonely eyes to you. It was the mid-nineties and the sun was blazing down on Ozone Park. Giuliani was in the hot seat at Gracie Mansion, he had just become the GOP Mayor earlier that year thanks to a powerhouse political club in South Queens.

Strolling down the block past La’ Bella Vita on any given evening you could hear the sounds of Frank Sinatra and the clinking glasses of a toastmaster. Tony Seminerio sat at the back table, the pungent aroma of cigar smoke would fill the stillness of the air as the revolving door opened and closed at what seemed like a thousand times a night.

It was that time of year again and the candidates were getting ready. Mayoral hopefuls had descended from their chic towers in the burgeoning metropolis to make the ten-minute journey over the East River and into Queens to jockey for district endorsements.

And it was then when Assemblyman Tony Seminerio was in his prime. He was already in the state Assembly for twenty years and was already a legend. He would walk in and everybody who worked the room went wild. Thousands of constituents would ask him for help, elected officials across the state would come to pay respect to a larger than life Assemblyman.

When Tony walked into a room in south Queens everyone acknowledged him. It was out of respect. A hundred people would rise to their feet as levity was swept away by pure admiration. “Hey how ya doin’ Tony good to see ya” said the doorman. “Not too bad kid I sent your son’s resume to City Hall.” Tony responded with his thick Queens accent, a question he must have been asked a thousand times before.

Tony pulled off the political Lufthansa heist for the Mayors Seat in the nineteen nineties, and he was in the perfect position to do so.

Everyone was about to find out, the 38th A.D Democratic club didn’t shine shoes anymore.

It felt like it was 1955. Tony would throw parties; classy parties and the young heavy metal looking guys would drink beer next to the men donning their Armani suits sipping cocktails. The spirit of fraternity permeated the air. In this clubhouse, brotherhood reigned supreme. The stock 1950s characters lined up at the bar comparing campaign stories, plotting their next moves and generally shooting the concordant breeze. It was an old school atmosphere, a rebirth, a renaissance, a snapshot back in time into the glory days of yesteryear where everyone was considered family.

The club’s prowess and reputation was built on the notorious charisma of Assemblyman Tony Seminerio – a cigar smoking, red wine drinking tough guy that could have been a character in a Scorsese film but was also known to have a heart of gold and would make an effort to help as many people as he could whenever they needed it. He was Tony the Gent. When people came to him with a real workable problem Tony often got misty eyed and took his personal time to help them in any community affair. While most legislators barely help constituents within their legislative duty, Tony would go above and beyond and do anything he could to help.

When most legislators have press conferences filled with false promises and false actions, Tony never held a press conference; he would assist people in total silence.

In the Mid-nineties, Tony was able to walk through the doors of Pataki’s office, Bruno’s office, and Giuliani’s office without a slight step.

Sheldon Silver’s staff called him the dream killer,

he was the only democratic lawmaker whom after Sheldon silver passed a bill in the state Assembly had enough clout with the republican state Senators to have the bill killed. In 1988, Tony helped state Senator, Serphin Maltese get elected and as payback Tony was gerrymandered to send a message, don’t ever help out the GOP. But instead of getting rid of him, they made him.

At Tony’s meetings, Giuliani would come in with his P.B.A entourage and sit at the opposite table as Queens Democratic boss Tom Manton the predecessor of Joe Crowley while Alan Hevisi would work the room.

Tony’s club had become the base for Republican chieftains like George Pataki, Al Stabile, Thomas Ognibene and Dennis Gallagher – they all had a home at the club. Tom Long would walk in and Tony would greet him with the respect that a Statesman would deserve.

The republicans would sometimes sit next to Chuck Schumer and Anthony Weiner. It was a weird hodgepodge but while most clubs are lucky to get their Assembly Member to show, hundreds danced while Tony Seminerio sang Italian songs.

Before he was elected to Assembly, Tony served as the Vice-President of the powerful Correction Officers union. Even though he was a social conservative and a pro-life advocate, Tony never swayed from his union roots. In return for supporting pro union legislation, the unions offered him political support – boots on the ground, which became his operative base.

Tony’s ascension to political boss climaxed as the point man, the go-to-guy for candidates vying for the votes in Queens. Hundreds owed him allegiance because he was masterful in his selection for patronage posts and favor trading.  When Giuliani struggled with the Queens GOP, he went for a sit down with Tony. After all, the 38th AD was the only district Pataki took in ’98 outside of Staten Island.

Tony had a legion of lawyers, union officials, correction officers, and constituents whom would work at his behest.

Before the dawn of the Internet and social networking, Tony would make one phone call and could organize a busload of hardened campaigners and send them to any part of the city to aid an election. He even had a group of young heavy metal guys called The Vultures whom hung out in Forest park. Tony would send them around knocking at doors. They were scary looking, but effective.

The 38th A.D club had a major contribution with Republicans like Thomas Ognibene, Dennis Gallagher, Serphin Maltese and Rudy Giuliani. Even Tom Long the Queens chair of the Conservative Party received a standing ovation and it was for a good reason, as a thank you. At the time, most of their campaign armies came courtesy of Tony. Even though they were Democrats, the 38th A.D club had become, in part, the foot soldiers of the Republican Party.

He also helped his fellow Dems. In 1996 when Ann-Margaret Carrozza ran against Doug Prescott, Shelly Silver made a personal request to Tony for help. In response, Tony sent a hundred foot soldiers into Bayside. Even Carrozza’s campaign manager was connected to him. Tom Catipano, who is also a former Assembly Member, had served as Tony’s consigliere for four decades.

When Eliot Spitzer ran for Attorney General of New York, he came by himself to a trattoria in Queens to kiss Tony’s ring. They brokered a deal and Tony agreed to help by sending soldiers to hand out fliers. Shortly after Spitzer’s victorious election, he took his time returning Tony’s phone calls – in a sense Spitzer was ducking him, a bad move that would later come back to haunt him as it wouldn’t be long before they would see each other again in the Capital. While standing in the well, Tony chatted amongst his colleagues.

When Spitzer walked into the room, Tony’s calm demeanor changed in the blink of an eye.

He unleashed a thunderous roar that echoed across the chamber, “Oh, you don’t return my calls? Go fuck yourself! Four years comes around real quick. ” Spitzer turned red as a group of legislators laughed at the top of their lungs.

Are there any clubs that could help out a candidate in the way Tony’s club could have helped a Marty Golden or Ray Kelly? With the Queens GOP engaged in a great civil war, the loss of clout compounded by a pyrrhic victory by Phil Ragusa over Tom Ognibene, the party is in shambles and far too fractal to field any viable candidates.

Presently, most Democratic clubs don’t fair any better than their Republican counterparts with the exception of clubs that focus on leadership, networking, attracting young people and performing community service, a winning combination.

It’s a strong formula for efficacy that is not mutually exclusive of strong leadership. The best clubs meet these requirements while  the rest are small and disillusioned by family dynasties and lobbyists connected to elected officials. For example an inside source said, “Powhattan, Tammany, it’s not what it used to be, everyone’s old.” Jumping to the other side of Queens, The Jefferson Club has twenty members and ten of them want to run for higher office. RFK is also a maturing organization. Ask certain clubs what community service they have performed lately and they’ll stare at you inquisitively, perhaps even hand over a small check – a seemingly empty gesture when compared to real political help like boots on the ground to collect petitions and help with gotv, and perhaps, maybe even a little genuine community service.

The strength of a club is measured in petitions. How many can you deliver? Typically today, the clubs are not only smaller in number then Tony’s club, not to mention aging, but they are highly unlikely to support a Republican candidate.

The conditions that put Mayor Giuliani into office no longer exist in Queens. Since then, if any Republican wants to win the Mayoralty they’d have to ally with a powerful Democratic club. Unless that happens it’s hard to imagine another Republican winning citywide office. Nowadays, a billionaire Independent can buy the election and wouldn’t even need a powerful Democratic house to bolster their ranks as the Republican party is so weak former police commissioner Ray Kelly, Marty Gold, and even Dan Halloran have been rumored to run for mayor. That’s how weak it is.

The heyday of the 38th A.D was a ten year span from 1993-2003. The club diminished when Giuliani left office and finally lost its fire when Tony had a heart attack. He couldn’t keep up with the lifestyle after his near brush with death.

Tony served as Assembly member beginning in 1978 but finally resigned in 2009 after pleading guilty to a single count of fraud, saying he had wrongly advanced the interests of a consulting client in connection with state business, according to a report in the New York Times.

In 2010, he passed away while serving out his prison sentence. With Tony out of the picture the fallout was disastrous.  Lobbying\consulting firms swelled in power and prestige as the heyday of the old clubhouse bosses came to an end.

Would Tony have payed such  groups? Doubtful, as he was his own powerbroker. This siege is underway across Queens from Astoria to Little Neck and there are only a few independent voices that stand in the way. Tony must be rolling in his grave.

To put it into perspective, Tony’s 38th A.D Democratic club was by far the largest democratic club in Queens County; it dwarfed any club that exists today. Presently, the 38th A.D Democratic club now boasts 20 members under the tutelage of incumbent Assemblyman Mike Miller and Councilwoman Liz Crowley. Down from the Seminerio heyday when there where over 750 active members.

As a citywide candidate, you can make a thousand phone calls yet it is unlikely that one political club or one Republican county organization could have a major impact. Why? Because Tony Seminerio was the last of the clubhouse bosses.

Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/12/the-last-of-the-club-house-bosses/

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Pols Jilt Civic For Crowley Fundraiser

From Queenscrap.blogspot.com

Crowley raises money while neglecting civic duty. Members of the Queens Civic Congress were upset to hear that their elected officials opted out of a recent legislative session to party hard and sing kareoke to raise money for boss, Joe Crowley.

City & State: Some members of the Queens Civic Congress — a politically influential group that represents more than 100 community organizations in the borough — were irked that instead of attending the organization’s recent legislative reception, several local pols were singing karaoke at a fundraiser for Congressman Joe Crowley. Paul Graziano, a longtime member of the organization, said he was surprised when a swath of photos appeared on Facebook showing politicians from around the city belting out tunes, including rival county leaders Vito Lopez and Joe Crowley singing a duet. A number of Democrats made it to both events, but those who attended only the Crowley fundraiser included Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Councilwoman Liz Crowley and Crowley himself, according to Graziano. “Obviously, some of the leadership was upset,” said Graziano. 

Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/12/pols-jilt-civic-for-crowley-fundraiser/

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Pols Unite To Save Jobs In Queens

Councilman James Gennaro joins (l. to r.) Councilman Dan Halloran, Assemblyman Ed Braunstein, Assemblywoman Grace Meng, Assemblyman Philip Goldfeder, state Sen. Toby Stavisky, U.S. Rep. Joseph Crowley, Assemblyman William Scarborough and Assemblyman Michael Simanowitz.

The facility, which employs more than 1,000 workers, may be shut down as the Postal Service struggles with a major budget crisis.

Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/12/pols-unite-to-save-jobs-in-queens/

Nov 29 2011

In The Halls Of Justice, The Only Justice Is In The Halls

Loyalty?

How does the Democratic party perpetuate its own power? Through manipulating the court system, according to the NY Times.

The Queens county surrogate court is a bastion of power hungry party loyalists. They are the batteries that makes the machine function.

Operatives and future candidates stay in the loop by towing the party line.

Luckily,  a few brave souls that are not afraid to speak out against a good ol’ boy system where loyalty is measured by submission.

Read the scathing NY Times article for the full scoop.

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Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/11/in-the-halls-of-justice-the-only-justice-is-in-the-halls/

Nov 10 2011

One-sided War delivers 12 Democratic Judges

Under the present system, Beltrani didn't stand a chance at becoming Justice of the Supreme Court of NY -he was on the wrong side of the aisle..

If you enter politics in NYC for the sole purpose of becoming a judge, stay away from the Republican party.

People go into politics for different reasons. Some want a job, some want the rush, while others want the justly nobler endeavor to serve the community.  Some are a combination.

The way to become a Supreme Court Justice in Queens is to kiss up the party, help other candidates, become district leader, or threaten to run for office. There’s multiple ways to do it. Different people wait for years, but it’s the Democratic clubs that choose Supreme Court judges. Whoever gets the nod for the coveted slot by the County organization is the candidate that becomes the Justice, in a way they are anointed.

There’s a two party system, but  we really have a one party system. Not enough people ever vote, and when they do its usually Democrat across the board especially during a primary or a judicial race.

Like the Soviet Union, party bosses hen peck judges for the Supreme Court of NY.

In the 11th judicial district in Queens, a total of 12 candidates, six Republicans and six Democrats, competed for six slots on the Supreme Court. The winners, according to a source, were Allan Weiss, Pam Jackman-Brown, Rudolph Greco, Janice Taylor, Timothy Dufficy, and Ira Margulis – all Democrats.

Would it be so terrible to have one Republican Justice?

It’s an uphill battle for Republicans. When you’re the county candidate for Supreme Court Justice, a few things happen that make your run a lot easier.

You get a small army of free petition carriers otherwise they wont come out unless you pay them. Some lackey will iron your robe and provide you with unlimited boilerplate expressions to throw around town while you’re introduced to the who’s who of party politics. Grassroots candidates, and GOP candidates are ill-matched against the establishment. They have to hire their own people at cost.

If you want to become a judge, you will need to become comfortable kissing ass.

It’s like getting a job, in a sense you too are hired by the county organization rather than elected. It happens in legislative elections but the ‘race’ for Supreme Court Justice is the most egregious example. The leadership has to like you. There is a vetting system judge candidates must pass, like being an attorney in good standing for 10 years, but you may never get to that point.

It’s not who has the best legal mind, it’s who handed out the most flyers.

You want to believe the system is good, but for the election of Supreme Court Justices that’s just the way it is.

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Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/11/supreme-court/

Nov 08 2011

How Christine Quinn Could Lose the Chance to Be Mayor of NYC

Bring it on. From Evidentlyblog.blogspot.com

"With a crowded primary I have a mean left hook."

Could there already be an organized movement to defeat undeclared mayoral candidate Christine Quinn? A man who’s work saved over 45,000 unborn children from certain death says he plans to deliver many times that number to vote against her.

The Founder of Expectant Mother Care is a kingpin of religious Catholics in New York. Accusing Quinn of “Gestapo-like tactics,” he’s galvanizing the Pro-Life movement for a voting bloc against a Quinn term—and some analysts say it could cause Quinn to stumble.

 

Chris Slattery is well known in churches of all denominations and founded the nonprofit group, Expectant Mother Care to encourage expectant moms to choose motherhood, and either marriage, adoption, or self-sufficiency, instead of abortion, according to the website.

Traditionally, social conservatives were considered a swing demographic, hard to predict, often marginalized, but never to be underestimated because of their large numbers says William Ferraro, a political consultant from the Pendulum Network.

Social conservatives were historically and traditionally Democrats, but the political climate has changed. Social conservatives support socially conservative ideology, which means that their votes could potentially go to a candidate with little concern for party enrollment.

For example, during the Presidential Election of 2000, a study found that 40 percent of the total vote for George Bush came from Christian Evangelicals, making it the largest single voting bloc in the Republican Party. However, Black Protestant voters, majorities of whom are Evangelical, voted 96 percent for Pro-Choice Democrat Al Gore and only 4 percent for George Bush, the Pro-Life candidate.

There are recent trends that indicate a change from the unpredictability of a socially conservative voting bloc. Single-issue positions like being Pro-Life or Pro-Choice seem to trump any party loyalty, even religious affiliation. This trend was a key factor in the election of Republican Congressman Bob Turner.

When Turner a Pro-Life Catholic businessman ran against an orthodox Pro-Choice Jewish Democrat David Weprin, Turner’s campaign launched a series of ads aimed squarely at the orthodox Jewish vote in the Ninth Congressional District, where Democrats enjoy a significant enrollment advantage. This demographic group rallied behind Turner because Weprin had voted in the state legislature for the same-sex marriage bill.

Republican campaign operative Steven Stites anticipates a problem for Quinn if the debate is framed by a stance on Pro-Life or Pro-Choice, which hasn’t happened yet. “If the issue is framed by her position on Pro-Life centers, there could be a problem during the general, but during a primary, social conservatives are under-represented,” according to Stites.

“Slattery is correct to be upset, but attacks from the right during a primary aren’t necessarily a bad thing for Quinn,” Stites added.

Is the axe coming down on Speaker Quinn as opposed to any of the other Democratic candidates? Could they swing votes away from Quinn and toward John Liu, Bill de Blasio, Scott Stringer, Tony Avella, or any other candidates? Yes, it could, if Slattery has anything to do with it. He wants Quinn’s policy maneuvering against crisis pregnancy centers to define her candidacy.

While the other potential candidates are also Pro-Choice, according to insiders in Slattery’s group no other candidate has the viciousness demonstrated by Quinn toward religious free speech.

Quinn and Bloomberg signed Local Law 17, which required crisis pregnancy centers, like Expectant Mother Care, to disclose more information about what services they perform and whom they will be provided by. Critics say the measure would force crisis pregnancy centers to advertise services they do not offer. The City Council approved the bill that would have placed strict limits on the advertising crisis pregnancy centers may use and required them to post signs designed to discourage women from seeking their abortion alternatives services.

Quinn called the matter a protection of consumer rights.

However Pro-Life advocates like Slattery say the bill put harsh restrictions on alternatives to abortions, such as adoption and counseling.

The law Quinn signed was challenged in Federal Court. Slattery’s group, EMC was one of the plaintiffs. A stay was issued, and according to legal experts it will probably be overturned. Judge William Pauley said the bill was “unconstitutionally vague”, although he conceded the harm that can be caused to pregnant, at-risk women by unlicensed ultrasound technicians “operating in pseudo-medical settings”.

Slattery hailed the decision as a victory for the First Amendment.

“The legislation was [Quinn’s] baby and [City Councilwoman] Jessica Lapin’s baby, we warned them it was unconstitutional to shut down our life saving operation” said Slattery. “But they went ahead anyway.”

Slattery alleges that Planned Parenthood and Naral New York may have been influencing Quinn’s active pursuit of bill 371 .

Naral Pro-Choice NY, then led then by Kellie Conlin, who was forced out in January from her post after pleading guilty to stealing $75,000 worth of donations from the organization said in a press release, “Unfortunately, when a woman enters a Crisis Pregnancy Center, she loses all expectation of accurate, unbiased information and any assurance of privacy. Instead, she is faced with biased counseling, anti-abortion propaganda, deliberate deception, and emotional manipulation.”

Slattery responded to Naral’s accusations,

“The woman [Kellie Conlin] who was forced out – that called us frauds – while she’s committing fraud” exclaimed Slattery who called it a “repugnant characterization” of his group “that was intended to be offensive.”

The dispute put Quinn in the crosshairs of social conservative voters who tend to support the use of government to reinforce traditional social relations, according to a Pew research report. So is it enough to galvanize a Pro-Life voting bloc, the same bloc vote once thought to be too unpredictable to be considered an effective movement in city elections?

Slattery’s movement is gaining traction.

Chris Slattery is more than an outspoken Quinn critic, he is well known by key members of all denominations that connect him to thousands of parishioners in all five boroughs.

In January, 2010 Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, a Pro-Life activist and a leader of the black community held a Pro-Life rally in Manhattan side-by-side with Chris Slattery of Expectant Mother Care where she encouraged opposition to Bill 371.

City Council Member Fernando Cabrera (D-Bronx), also the only Reverend in the City Council is a staunch advocate of Slattery’s movement.

Cabrera, who for the last four years, has co-chaired the Hispanic-Jewish Relations Task Force for the Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion, began a church called New Life Outreach International, a congregation that has swelled to over 400 members. He is also well known in a network of Evangelical churches that are spreading like wildfire throughout the five boroughs, according to inside sources.

Will they come out on election day?

“It’s a set of core values that unites us,” said City Councilman Dan Halloran (R-Whitestone) who spoke at a Save The Life Center rally. Council District 19 is the most ethnically and religiously diverse in the City. Protestant groups, Baptists, Lutherans, Hindus, Catholics, and a large Jewish demographic of conservative, orthodox, and reform Jews can be found in the northeast section of Queens. “We all coexist because we respect the values of our community, said Halloran, adding “We will not back down and we will continue to advocate for you.”

Critics fear that Quinn has awoken a sleeping giant. With six or seven possible candidates running, if her campaign thinks she will win with the social conservative base actively campaigning against her, she could be gravely mistaken.

There could be 5,000 parishes, temples, and synagogues turning against her. Will the residents be so upset that they vote for another candidate or is it just a case of saber rattling?

“It was a use of raw political power in a complete disregard for the first amendment and the rights of Christians and almost all Catholic and Christian Pro Lifers” said Slattery.

“I am in fear and trepidation in her run for mayor, she will put the jackboot to Christians in the city and stomp on our necks for us to cry uncle and to shutdown millennial old moral underpinnings and traditions,” he added.

Slattery said the Pro-Life movement would not support candidates that are Pro-Choice. But Quinn took it a step further with her bill that would have crippled Expectant Mother Care and other crisis pregnancy centers that Pro-Lifers like Slattery have embraced.

Slattery believed the bill was a direct challenge to his organization’s mission, but so far, the other candidates have not been as active as Quinn with the intent of shutting down the life centers.

“Bloomberg and Quinn use the schools as an experiment in birth and population control, they have completely disregarded the astounding abortion rates and ratios in New York,” Slattery said. “They think the only way to prevent pregnancy is to flood the city with more condoms.”

Slattery agreed that while“they [public schools] haven’t had overtly bad sex education, its covertly and without former curriculum: tie-ins and programs to escort school children to planned parenthood, it’s been happening for 40 years.”

“Reading writing arithmetic, mapping out roots to the abortion — this man is crazy. Quinn is even more radical than Bloomberg.”

Socially conservative groups like Slattery’s could be the deciding factor in the Democratic primary, much in the same way the socially conservative religious voting bloc came out in force for the election of Congressman Bob Turner in Queens and Brooklyn.

Quinn’s decision to support Local Law 17 was influenced by her campaign contributors Slattery alleged.

“Its all about who she’s getting her campaign funds from: Naral Pro-choice, Planned Parenthood, the abortionists. The Catholic press is softball, they won’t name names and they don’t really call these politicians to account, they decry the whole body. Pastors don’t play enough hardball. They’ve been emasculated by there fear of politicians. I don’t understand them, the people in the pews will be making the decisions.

If Quinn loses these voters, as Slattery believes she will, it is likely that these votes will go to John Liu, a Queens native, according to a Democratic official. Lots of people are already behind John Liu, and it is widely rumored that Quinn threw him under the bus with a recent ruling regarding campaign signs and a probe of questionable campaign contributions.

Queens Democratic Party Boss Joe Crowley, who is Pro-Life, and was raised in the cradle of old school conservatives of Irish decent would be caught in the middle. “Because of Joe Crowley’s prominence in the Irish-Catholic community – he would understand better than most people what’s coming” said Elio Forcina, a Republican, and former Assembly candidate who also helped organize a fundraiser for Expectant Mother Care in May 2011 for an ultra sound machine that is currently being used in Brooklyn.

“If the Catholic parishes, the evangelicals, and the synagogues all unite, they could ultimately derail Quinn’s campaign,” according to Forcina. “May the fruits that grow out of this movement ultimately be Christine Quinn’s redemption,” he said.

Religious convictions appear to trump party loyalty. Many Americans continue to say their religious beliefs have been influential in shaping their views about social issues, including abortion and same-sex marriage, according to Pew research, but it doesn’t always translate into votes. It’s how a liberal and a conservative like Fernando Cabrera and Dan Halloran and a civil rights leader like Dr. Aveda King can find some common ground.

The potential galvanization of socially conservative church-going voters against Christine Quinn as the Democratic nominee for Mayor should not go unnoticed. Bill 371 has been the rallying cry. Past elections can illustrate the voting bloc as fickle and unreliable. How likely is it that the bloc would vote for a Lesbian Democrat from the West Side of Manhattan, anyway? Not very likely, but there are recent examples that may prove the observation as not entirely accurate. Quinn may have inadvertently energized Pro-Life voters against her campaign at the same time a massive mobilization of Pro-Lifers appears to be underway unlike anything New York City has seen before.

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Permanent link to this article: http://queens-politics.com/2011/11/how-christine-quinn-could-lose-the-democratic-primary-for-mayor/

Oct 17 2011

Lew Simons of The World Getting Attention

Hon. Lew Simon. Democratic District Leader 23rd A.D. Part B, best known for chasing raccoons says he will keep the mustache at all costs. This is an important man.

Shocking: Democratic clubs with ten members get to choose Mayoral Candidate.

Who’s canoodling for attention these days? I’ll tell you. The following ‘candidates’ are competing for Queens party boss Joe Crowley’s attention – and to a lesser degree Brooklyn party boss Vito Lopez.

How are they doing it? Visiting local Democratic Clubs, flirting with District Leaders, even the one’s with a few screws loose, according to insiders.

District Leaders heavily influence the Democratic party’s nomination process. In Queens, it’s tantamount to election. Political hopefuls, or more often than not, party insiders get the endorsement, which some call a corronation. Many of these clubs barely qualify as clubs. It’s pathetic, but standard procedure.

It’s that time of year. So expect a visit from these candidates at your local political club.

For those of you in multiple clubs expect to hear the same speech.

Here they are:

  1. Quinn
  2. Liu
  3. Thompson
  4. Avella
  5. de Blasio

“Joe Crowley will need disinfectant because everyone will be kissing his ring.”

What is a District Leader?

A District leader is an unpaid elected party position. District Leaders often arise from political clubs. Each Assembly District has a male and female post and they serve for two years. Republicans too. Sometimes it’s a patronage post (have this so you stop crying about wanting to run when we already picked someone) and sometimes it’s a springboard for higher office. It’s like getting your foot in the door. DL’s reward loyalty by hiring poll workers. Some DL’s are more vocal and do great things for the community while others have questionable residencies. Generally I see them as little party whips. They play a role for endorsements during campaign season, help elected judges, and are generally political insiders.

For a great article on the duties of a District Leader read M. Burgo’s blog post on How To Pick A District Leader.

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